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The Battle of Bosworth Mosaic: The Final Clash Of Civil Armies

As always, our clients request the most magnificent custom mosaics that always leave our artists in awe. Our Battle of Bosworth Custom Mosaic Reproduction measures 15 square meter. It required 2 months to be completed by our artists!

However, this mosaic artwork is more than just a mural. Within each mosaic stone, there’s a story of a soldier and the suffering of those who lost and the joy of the victorious.

Find the video of this mosaic artwork below!

The Battle of Bosworth Mosaic Reproduction in the Making 
| Mozaico
The Battle of Bosworth Mosaic Reproduction in the Making

Some Interesting Facts About the Battle of Bosworth

As history reveals, this battle took place on 22 August 1485 between the Houses of Lancaster and York. It extended across England in the latter half of the 15th century. 

This scene captures Richard III charging into battle as a hail of cannon fire fell down on Henry Tudor’s army as they struggled to make their way around the marsh. They pressed on until the armies met in the moors and the war became then a brutal clash of steel, skin, and blood. This mosaic artwork captures a monumental event in the epic finale to the English war of roses.

Marking a significant date in British history, this battle marked the death of Richard III, Yorkist King and it didn’t extend beyond noon of the same day. 

1. It Wasn’t Fought in Bosworth

It only became known as the battle of Bosworth from around 25 years after it was fought. Instead, contemporaries knew it as the battle of ‘Redemore’, meaning place of reeds. Other names for the battle included ‘Brownheath’ and ‘Sandeford’.

Bosworth Battlefield from Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Center and Country Park
Bosworth Battlefield from Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Center and Country Park

The site of where the conflict took place has now been located two miles from the battlefield centre, close to the villages of Dadlington and Stoke Golding. The landscape would have been a marshy plainland (later to be drained), across which ran a Roman road. 

2. The Battle Site Stretched for Miles

The number of men in this battle is astounding. All the artwork that documented it doesn’t give the impression that Richard III had around 15000 fighting by his side. Or that Henry Tudor’s army was composed of 5000 men with the support of another 6000 from the Stanely Brothers. Now take a moment to imagine the magnitude of such battle. 

3. Richard Ventured While Henry Watched

Source: Getty Images - King Richard III
Source: Getty Images – King Richard III

Henry was a novice when it came to battles and he remained at the back while his forces were led by the Lancasterian General John de Vere. With his vast experience in war and battles, Richard came prepared with an arsenal of 140 cannons, which launched more than 30 shots. Never in European medieval history was that amount of cannon shots ever documented. 

 King Henry VII Tudor
Source: Wikipedia – King Henry VII Tudor

4. Richard was Betrayed

Anyone who hasn’t heard of this battle might think that Richard III won. Quite the contrary. A betrayal among his Earls led to his demise and defeat. The Earl of Northumberland Henry Percy stood still and didn’t engage. Consequently, Richard’s strategy was compromised. 

5. The King of York Refused to Flee

Historians reported that Richard III was offered a horse to flee the scene when his defeat was inevitable. The courageous King refused and said:”This day I will die as a King or win”. This mosaic artwork documents the exact moment when Richard III charged alongside 200 men with his crown over his helmet. He later died by a Welsh halberdier and a dagger; he had blows and gouge marks on his skull. 

This story is an immortal one, further immortalized by this mosaic reproduction. It is a battle of treachery, victory and defeat that rippled through British history.

The Battle of Bosworth Mosaic Reproduction by Mozaico

If you love exploring history and would like to know more about mosaics, take a look at our History of Mosaics blog! You love famous paintings and artworks? Explore these Mosaic Reproductions that will amaze you!

Would like to know more about another mosaic reproduction? Let us know in the comments!

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